todaysdocument:

Meter reading was very stylish in 1918.  
“Minneapolis General Electric Co. Meter Readers” is dated August 31, 1918 and comes from the Records of the Women’s Bureau, Department of Labor.  

todaysdocument:

Meter reading was very stylish in 1918.  

“Minneapolis General Electric Co. Meter Readers” is dated August 31, 1918 and comes from the Records of the Women’s Bureau, Department of Labor.  

Cite Arrow reblogged from todaysdocument
todaysdocument:

Because you probably don’t know what a “teletype” machine looks like…     
ourpresidents:

The White House to Kremlin “Hotline” 
On August 30, 1963, The Kennedy White House announced the creation of a teletype “Hotline” between the Kremlin and the White House.  The Hotline was established in the aftermath to the Cuban Missile Crisis -  to be used only in an emergency to ensure clear communication between the President and the Soviet Premier.
The White House Hotline teletype machine was used for the first time for communication between President Lyndon Johnson and Soviet Premier Alexsei Kosygin during the Six Day War in the Middle East. 
These days, the Hotline machine is on exhibit at the LBJ Library & Museum. 

todaysdocument:

Because you probably don’t know what a “teletype” machine looks like…     

ourpresidents:

The White House to Kremlin “Hotline”

On August 30, 1963, The Kennedy White House announced the creation of a teletype “Hotline” between the Kremlin and the White House.  The Hotline was established in the aftermath to the Cuban Missile Crisis -  to be used only in an emergency to ensure clear communication between the President and the Soviet Premier.

The White House Hotline teletype machine was used for the first time for communication between President Lyndon Johnson and Soviet Premier Alexsei Kosygin during the Six Day War in the Middle East.

These days, the Hotline machine is on exhibit at the LBJ Library & Museum

Cite Arrow reblogged from todaysdocument

todaysdocument:

“I Have a Dream” today…

In part 3 of “The March,” we hear Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech. This film was produced by the United States Information Agency (USIA) about the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.

Read the transcript for this segment and watch Part 1 and Part 2 of “The March.”

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todaysdocument:

August 28, 1963 - The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

These are images of the march from the Washington Monument to the Lincoln Memorial.  

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todaysdocument:

Preparing for the March on Washington

Part 1 of the film, “The March,” shows planning stages of the 1963 March on Washington, including volunteers making 80,000 cheese sandwiches, passing out “I March for Jobs and Freedom” pins, sound checks, singing the night before the March, and people arriving in Washington, DC on the morning of August 28, 1963.

Read the transcript of Part 1 of “The March.”  

Cite Arrow reblogged from todaysdocument

todaysdocument:

Suffrage did not come easy. 

The 19th Amendment was ratified on August 18, 1920.  These photos and documents within the records of the National Archives show that the right to vote was not easily won.  

Cite Arrow reblogged from todaysdocument
todaysdocument:

August 17, 1962 - Peter Fechter is killed trying to cross the Berlin Wall.  
One year after the construction of the Berlin Wall, Peter Fechter was killed by East German border guards. 
The original caption: 

The Death of A Refugee
Shot in the back while trying to escape over the Berlin Wall, Peter Fechter, 18, lay suffering for more than an hour while the Communist border guards who had fatally wounded him looked on impassively. Marks in the sand were made from Fechter’s bloody hand as the boy writhed in pain and called for help.  

todaysdocument:

August 17, 1962 - Peter Fechter is killed trying to cross the Berlin Wall.  

One year after the construction of the Berlin Wall, Peter Fechter was killed by East German border guards. 

The original caption: 

The Death of A Refugee

Shot in the back while trying to escape over the Berlin Wall, Peter Fechter, 18, lay suffering for more than an hour while the Communist border guards who had fatally wounded him looked on impassively. Marks in the sand were made from Fechter’s bloody hand as the boy writhed in pain and called for help.  

Cite Arrow reblogged from todaysdocument