theatlantic:

Occupy Wall Street Spreads Beyond NYC

Protestors march through downtown Boise, Idaho, Wednesday October 5, 2011. Activists have been showing solidarity with movement in many cities, including Occupy Boise. More than 100 people withstood an afternoon downpour in Idaho’s capital to protest. (AP Photo, Idaho Statesman/Darin Oswald)

Occupy ALL the streets! See more photos at In Focus

theatlantic:

Occupy Wall Street Spreads Beyond NYC

Protestors march through downtown Boise, Idaho, Wednesday October 5, 2011. Activists have been showing solidarity with movement in many cities, including Occupy Boise. More than 100 people withstood an afternoon downpour in Idaho’s capital to protest. (AP Photo, Idaho Statesman/Darin Oswald)

Occupy ALL the streets! See more photos at In Focus

Cite Arrow reblogged from theatlantic
dallasclayton:

My marker habit is getting heavy.

dallasclayton:

My marker habit is getting heavy.

Cite Arrow reblogged from dallasclayton-deactivated201304
theatlantic:

Occupy Wall Street

In New York City’s Financial District, hundreds of activists have been converging on Lower Manhattan over the past two weeks, protesting as part of an “Occupy Wall Street” movement. The protests are largely rallies against the influence of corporate money in politics, but participants’ grievances also include frustrations with corporate greed, anger at financial and social inequality, and several other issues. Nearly 80 people were arrested last weekend in a series of incidents with the New York police as the protesters attempted to march uptown. Most are now camped out in nearby Zucotti Park. Demonstrations also took place yesterday in San Francisco, and an “Occupy Boston” protest is planned for tonight, September 30. Collected here are a handful of images of the protesters occupying Wall Street from the past two weeks.

See more excellent photos from Occupy Wall Street at In Focus

theatlantic:

Occupy Wall Street

In New York City’s Financial District, hundreds of activists have been converging on Lower Manhattan over the past two weeks, protesting as part of an “Occupy Wall Street” movement. The protests are largely rallies against the influence of corporate money in politics, but participants’ grievances also include frustrations with corporate greed, anger at financial and social inequality, and several other issues. Nearly 80 people were arrested last weekend in a series of incidents with the New York police as the protesters attempted to march uptown. Most are now camped out in nearby Zucotti Park. Demonstrations also took place yesterday in San Francisco, and an “Occupy Boston” protest is planned for tonight, September 30. Collected here are a handful of images of the protesters occupying Wall Street from the past two weeks.

See more excellent photos from Occupy Wall Street at In Focus

Cite Arrow reblogged from theatlantic
theatlantic:

The Death of Troy Davis

In a perfect world, the execution of Troy Davis Wednesday night in Georgia would herald a new era in America’s grim history with the death penalty. It would shake the criminal justice system out of its self-satisfied torpor and force government and the governed both to face the ugly truth about capital punishment in the United States in the twenty-first century. It would propel this question to the forefront both of the nation’s political debate and the Supreme Court’s docket: How many exceptions to the rule must we allow or tolerate, how many legitimate questions must linger beyond the death chamber, before we either fix the system or end the experiment?
When the state kills those whose guilt is in serious doubt, or when the state kills those to whom it has not given fair justice, it doesn’t just perform an injustice upon the individual, the rule of law, and the Constitution. It also undermines the very legitimacy of the death penalty itself, for its continuing use as a sentencing option derives its civic and moral strength mostly from the fiction that it can be, and is, credibly and reliably imposed. Once our confidence in that credibility is shattered, as it should be now that Davis is gone, all that’s left of the death penalty is state-sponsored retribution and the hangman’s noose.

Andrew Cohen parses the significance of the Georgia execution in the history of American capital punishment. Read more at The Atlantic

theatlantic:

The Death of Troy Davis

In a perfect world, the execution of Troy Davis Wednesday night in Georgia would herald a new era in America’s grim history with the death penalty. It would shake the criminal justice system out of its self-satisfied torpor and force government and the governed both to face the ugly truth about capital punishment in the United States in the twenty-first century. It would propel this question to the forefront both of the nation’s political debate and the Supreme Court’s docket: How many exceptions to the rule must we allow or tolerate, how many legitimate questions must linger beyond the death chamber, before we either fix the system or end the experiment?

When the state kills those whose guilt is in serious doubt, or when the state kills those to whom it has not given fair justice, it doesn’t just perform an injustice upon the individual, the rule of law, and the Constitution. It also undermines the very legitimacy of the death penalty itself, for its continuing use as a sentencing option derives its civic and moral strength mostly from the fiction that it can be, and is, credibly and reliably imposed. Once our confidence in that credibility is shattered, as it should be now that Davis is gone, all that’s left of the death penalty is state-sponsored retribution and the hangman’s noose.

Andrew Cohen parses the significance of the Georgia execution in the history of American capital punishment. Read more at The Atlantic

Cite Arrow reblogged from theatlantic

theatlantic:

Japan Earthquake: Six Months Later

Yesterday, the world commemorated the 10th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks on the United States, but Sunday had another significance for Japan. It marked six months since the massive earthquake and tsunami on March 11, a date now seared in the country’s national consciousness. At 2:46 that afternoon, a 9.0 magnitude earthquake struck Japan offshore, triggering a tsunami wave of up to 10 meters (33 ft) that engulfed large parts of northeastern Japan and also damaged the Fukushima nuclear plant, causing the worst nuclear crisis in decades. The current number of dead and missing is estimated to be 22,900. Gathered here are some recent images from the region, including 12 before-and-after photo pairs (starting with photo number two) that you can click to see the difference six months can make.

See more incredible before-and-after shots at In Focus

Cite Arrow reblogged from theatlantic
theatlantic:

9/11: The Past Decade

In the 10 years since the attacks of 9/11, much has changed in the world. Led by the United States, western nations invaded and occupied Afghanistan and later Iraq, removing their rulers and unleashing sectarian violence and insurgencies. Hundreds of thousands of soldiers and civilians have lost their lives at a cost of trillions of dollars, and western military forces remain in both countries. A third war, the War on Terror, has driven changes in the U.S. that have pushed against the limits of what American society will accept in return for security — measures such as pre-emptive military strikes, indefinite detentions, waterboarding, wiretapping, and invasive airport security systems. As we remember those lost on September 11, 2001, and construction of the new skyscrapers in Manhattan nears completion, most U.S, troops are scheduled to leave Iraq by the end of this year and Afghanistan by 2014. Here is a look at some of the events of the post-9/11 decade, and some of the progress still being made.

See more powerful photos at In Focus

theatlantic:

9/11: The Past Decade

In the 10 years since the attacks of 9/11, much has changed in the world. Led by the United States, western nations invaded and occupied Afghanistan and later Iraq, removing their rulers and unleashing sectarian violence and insurgencies. Hundreds of thousands of soldiers and civilians have lost their lives at a cost of trillions of dollars, and western military forces remain in both countries. A third war, the War on Terror, has driven changes in the U.S. that have pushed against the limits of what American society will accept in return for security — measures such as pre-emptive military strikes, indefinite detentions, waterboarding, wiretapping, and invasive airport security systems. As we remember those lost on September 11, 2001, and construction of the new skyscrapers in Manhattan nears completion, most U.S, troops are scheduled to leave Iraq by the end of this year and Afghanistan by 2014. Here is a look at some of the events of the post-9/11 decade, and some of the progress still being made.

See more powerful photos at In Focus

Cite Arrow reblogged from theatlantic
futurejournalismproject:

Maps + Mashups + Conflicts + History = Conflict History
Part amazing, part depressing, Conflict History is a Google Maps timeline mashup that lets you browse from past to present to learn about the world’s conflicts.
The screenshot above shows 2001-2010. Selecting the Info icon on the left gives background information on the conflict with additional links to related materials. The slider on the bottom brings you forward and back in time.
For example, we just learned about the Sicilian Wars of 600 to 264 BCE.
Most of the content is pulled from Wikipedia and Freebase, a Creative Commons licensed data source.

futurejournalismproject:

Maps + Mashups + Conflicts + History = Conflict History

Part amazing, part depressing, Conflict History is a Google Maps timeline mashup that lets you browse from past to present to learn about the world’s conflicts.

The screenshot above shows 2001-2010. Selecting the Info icon on the left gives background information on the conflict with additional links to related materials. The slider on the bottom brings you forward and back in time.

For example, we just learned about the Sicilian Wars of 600 to 264 BCE.

Most of the content is pulled from Wikipedia and Freebase, a Creative Commons licensed data source.

(Source: futurejournalismproject)

Cite Arrow reblogged from theatlantic
theatlantic:

Afghanistan: August 2011

US Army Flight Medic Brandon Lowther (left) holds the hand of a fatally wounded US army soldier as he is airlifted by the Medevac helicopter of 159th Brigade Task Force Thunder, on August 24, 2011, to Kandahar Hospital Role 3. Two US soldiers were heavily injured by gun shots and brought to the hospital. (Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images)

Just in case you forgot there’s a war on. See more vivid photos at In Focus

theatlantic:

Afghanistan: August 2011

US Army Flight Medic Brandon Lowther (left) holds the hand of a fatally wounded US army soldier as he is airlifted by the Medevac helicopter of 159th Brigade Task Force Thunder, on August 24, 2011, to Kandahar Hospital Role 3. Two US soldiers were heavily injured by gun shots and brought to the hospital. (Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images)

Just in case you forgot there’s a war on. See more vivid photos at In Focus

Cite Arrow reblogged from theatlantic
3rdofmay:

The art: Barbara Kruger, Untitled (Questions), 1991. (The work is photographic silkscreen on vinyl, 66 3/16 by 92 5/8 by 2 1/2 inches.)
The news: “Getting Away With Torture: Dick Cheney’s memoir shows the importance of the law, not torture,” by Dalia Lithwick for Slate. 
The source: Collection of the Hessel Museum of Art, Center for Curatorial Studies, Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, NY. This work will be included in the MoMA PS1 exhibition “September 11,” curated by Peter Eleey. The show opens on Sept. 11. 

3rdofmay:

The art: Barbara Kruger, Untitled (Questions), 1991. (The work is photographic silkscreen on vinyl, 66 3/16 by 92 5/8 by 2 1/2 inches.)

The news: “Getting Away With Torture: Dick Cheney’s memoir shows the importance of the law, not torture,” by Dalia Lithwick for Slate. 

The source: Collection of the Hessel Museum of Art, Center for Curatorial Studies, Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, NY. This work will be included in the MoMA PS1 exhibition “September 11,” curated by Peter Eleey. The show opens on Sept. 11. 

Cite Arrow reblogged from 3rdofmay