oupacademic:

How do opera and philosophy intersect? There is no single answer to this question. From its inception, opera has engaged with philosophical themes across a wide spectrum, including ethics, metaphysics, and existentialism. Equally, from Rousseau through Kierkegaard and Nietzsche, to Adorno, Williams, Žižek, Dolar, and beyond, opera has captured the imaginations of philosophers. And scholars of opera have long, but increasingly of late, drawn on philosophical resources in their investigations, a development documented with particular acuity in the pages of this very journal in recent years.
The Opera Quarterly explores the intersection of opera and philosophy in the current special issue which is free to read until the end of October.
Image credit: Opera House. Public domain via Pixabay.

oupacademic:

How do opera and philosophy intersect? There is no single answer to this question. From its inception, opera has engaged with philosophical themes across a wide spectrum, including ethics, metaphysics, and existentialism. Equally, from Rousseau through Kierkegaard and Nietzsche, to Adorno, Williams, Žižek, Dolar, and beyond, opera has captured the imaginations of philosophers. And scholars of opera have long, but increasingly of late, drawn on philosophical resources in their investigations, a development documented with particular acuity in the pages of this very journal in recent years.

The Opera Quarterly explores the intersection of opera and philosophy in the current special issue which is free to read until the end of October.

Image credit: Opera House. Public domain via Pixabay.

Cite Arrow reblogged from oupacademic

Oh, you’ve got green eyes
Oh, you’ve got blue eyes
Oh, you’ve got grey eyes
And I’ve never seen anyone quite like you before
No, I’ve never met anyone quite like you before

(Source: youtube.com)

buongiorno:

Karen Peris of the Innocence Mission has just put out a new album, Violet. While it is sure to be one of the more beautiful things recorded this year, here is Karen’s description of the album in case you need convincing: 

“While we have been working on a new (the innocence mission) record, we’ve also enjoyed making recordings of a group of songs that seemed to belong together on a separate album. They were all written on piano. Some have words and are sung. I guess that’s a bit redundant, unless we consider the possibility that they could have been rap songs. Well, anyway, about half the songs are sung, with piano and with beautiful guitar parts from Don. And the other half are piano, or piano and pump organ, and some other instruments. My instruments are all fairly old and NOISY, so Don gets a special award for most patient and excellent engineer. He worked so meticulously to record my old spinet and little field (pump) organ. The accordion was the funny last straw, it’s started to sound like a giant bowl of rice crispies, so it is having a small rest. I’m thrilled that our children have added wonderful violin and viola parts to two of the songs. So I’ve had tremendous help with this record, which is called Violet, and it really has been a joy to make.”

You can listen to the whole thing right here via band camp.  

I feel aerialiste will like this.

Cite Arrow reblogged from j----me

runecestershire:

The Folger Consort’s album A Distant Mirror is perfect for Shakespeare Histories binging. The first part of the album is mediaeval music (congruent with the setting of the Histories) and the second part is music expressly associated with Shakespeare, most of it from his time (with a bit of Purcell thrown in to round things out).

Cite Arrow reblogged from runecestershire

Mavis Staples - I’ll Take You There (live)

(Source: Spotify)

#Brody Dalle #St Vincent #instagram

#Brody Dalle #St Vincent #instagram

Cite Arrow reblogged from lungs-paper-frail

Chelsea Wolfe - Movie Screen (at Room 205)

turn down the lights, don headphones, relax and get yourself into a gloomy Portishead-meets-Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein state of mind.

these people, they get me

(Source: youtube.com)

bush-party:

Aquarela do Brasil with music by Michael Kamen and vocals by Kate Bush

Aquarela do Brasil is one of the most famous Brazilian songs worldwide. It was written in 1939 and covered for the 1985 Terry Gillam film Brazil by the film’s composer Michael Kamen. This version featured vocals by Kate Bush, but never became widely known. Please enjoy it today, on Brazil’s Dia da Independência (September 7th).

Cite Arrow reblogged from bush-party

forgottenness:

I borrowed the text in my previous post from Sarah Harmer. This song was my anthem for five years in Boston, when…I lived in a basement apartment. Not pleasant at the time — Augusts were always brutally humid — but I’d take it now, yes I would.

I also think the year of this song probably dates me as a fossil: so be it. It seems just as long ago to me, too.

still clinging to that Tumblr hiatus (hahahaha yeah right) but I couldn’t not say: SARAH HARMER FUCK YEAH.

Cite Arrow reblogged from forgottenness