On a January evening of the early seventies, Christine Nilsson was singing in Faust at the Academy of Music in New York. Opening line of The Age of Innocence, by Edith Wharton
Life is a gamble, at terrible odds — if it was a bet you wouldn’t take it. Tom Stoppard, Rosencrantz & Guildenstern Are Dead (via liquidnight)
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betterbooktitles:

F. Scott Fitzgerald: This Side of Paradise
Reader Submission: Title and Redesign by Keenan Cross.

betterbooktitles:

F. Scott Fitzgerald: This Side of Paradise

Reader Submission: Title and Redesign by Keenan Cross.

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Did I murder the old woman? I killed myself, not that old creature! Then and there I murdered myself at one blow, for ever! …But it was the devil who killed the old hag, not I… Fyodor Dostoevsky, Crime and Punishment (via greatrelease)
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libraryland:

Banned from the U.S. as obscene for 15 years. Click here to read it free online.

libraryland:

Banned from the U.S. as obscene for 15 years. Click here to read it free online.

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And with my cheek leant upon the window pane I like to fancy that I am pressing as closely as can be upon the massy wall of time, which is forever lifting and pulling and letting fresh spaces of life in upon us. May it be mine to taste the moment before it has spread itself over the rest of the world! Let me taste the newest and the freshest. Virginia Woolf, “The Journal of Mistress Joan Martyn” (via liquidnight)
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We still, alas, cannot forestall it—

This dreadful ailment’s heavy toll;

The spleen is what the English call it,

We call it simply Russian soul.

Eugene Onegin, Alexander Pushkin (via i-starchild)
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What I want is to possess my readers while they are reading my book— if I can, to possess them in ways that other writers don’t. Then let them return, just as they were, to a world where everybody else is working to change, persuade, tempt, and control them. The best readers come to fiction to be free of all that noise, to have set loose in them the consciousness that’s otherwise conditioned and hemmed in by all that isn’t fiction. This is something that every child, smitten by books, understands immediately, though it’s not at all a childish idea about the importance of reading. Philip Roth (via libraryland)
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The first time I read an excellent work, it is to me just as if I gained a new friend; and when I read over a book I have perused before, it resembles the meeting of an old one. George Gissing (via libraryland)
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Life is infinitely stranger than anything which the mind of man could invent. We would not dare to conceive the things which are really mere commonplaces of existence. If we could fly out of that window hand in hand, hover over this great city, gently remove the roofs, and peep in at the queer things which are going on, the strange coincidences, the plannings, the cross-purposes, the wonderful chains of events, working through generations, and leading to the most outre results, it would make all fiction with its conventionalities and foreseen conclusions most stale and unprofitable. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, “A Case of Identity”
From The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes (via liquidnight)
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