the thing about sexism is that

mswyrr:

it’s just gets really boring and repetitive and, quite the opposite of wanting to be offended, i’d rather think about anything more interesting. but there it is, refusing to go away, and there are people, being totally shitty in ways both painful and monotonous

oh, you’re sam pepper holding women captive on the street and sexually assaulting them! this is totally not new and yet terribly painful and wrong

oh you’re threatening women like anita sarkeesian and emma watson who dare express an opinion about women’s issues! that’s… a repetition of shit that has been done for hundreds if not thousands of years

monotonous but agonizing

it’s a really unpleasant combo

monotonous but agonizing

It’s like being depressed! ….except all the horrible nasty internal voices are all externalized. And can’t spell. And are wearing fedoras.

Cite Arrow reblogged from mswyrr
You came into the restaurant where I work and ordered a Stoli on the rocks. When I asked you and your companion if you’d be eating, or needing anything else from me, you put your hand — ever so gently — ON MY ASS and asked if you could take me ‘to go’. When I immediately stepped away and said “Sorry, what?’ you probably gathered that I was and am not receptive of such advances from customers…

“Maybe — just maybe — via the intimately connected internet world, my post will reach you, and you’ll learn something about how hurtful and upsetting a small comment or gesture might be. Or at the very least, maybe a Facebook passerby will read this and more deeply consider how they treat women, how they treat servers, and/or how they treat other people in general.
Bartender publicly shames customer who groped her, quits job in a blaze of glory  (via micdotcom)
Cite Arrow reblogged from akycha
aerialiste:

theredshoes:

aerialiste:

likeafieldmouse:

Typewriters of famous authors

I want Cormac’s (hasn’t he’s gone through a couple of Olivettis?)

Why are these all men’s? Typewriters were traditionally associated with women — IBM the “secretary’s friend,” and so on.
'typewriters & the men who loved them’ in Smith Journal issue one features images of Robert’s typewriters
Because clearly female writers were never associated with typewriters! OH WAIT
(via)
Anne Sexton
Flannery O’Connor
Isak Dinesen
I could go on. But here:
In the beginning, few people imagined that anyone would compose at the machine. The user of the typewriter would be an amanuensis—in other words, a secretary—taking dictation from another person. Accordingly, in the early days the word “typewriter” was used to mean not just the machine but the person plying it. That person, the Remington folks assumed, would be a woman. (The flowers printed on the casing of the early models were to make the mechanism seem friendly to the weaker sex.) Remington’s prediction was correct. It was often as typists that women poured into the professional workforce at the turn of the century. 

in which theredshoes made this 10000000 times better

(I inherited & used the same Smith-Corona model as Plath did, which always pleases me inordinately)

Heh, I’m just always such the Angry Feminist Bitch Demanding Representation, always. WHERE ARE THE WOMEN AT? WE’RE MORE THAN HALF, DAMMIT, THERE SHOULD BE SOME OF US IN THERE. When I was a teenager I read that bit — is it Samuel R. Delany’s? — about how when you think there’s an equal number of men and women somewhere, if you count, it’s almost always 1/3 women or less, and ever sine then it’s been automatic.

aerialiste:

theredshoes:

aerialiste:

likeafieldmouse:

Typewriters of famous authors

I want Cormac’s (hasn’t he’s gone through a couple of Olivettis?)

Why are these all men’s? Typewriters were traditionally associated with women — IBM the “secretary’s friend,” and so on.

'typewriters & the men who loved them’ in Smith Journal issue one features images of Robert’s typewriters

Because clearly female writers were never associated with typewriters! OH WAIT

image

(via)

Anne Sexton

Flannery O’Connor Isak Dinesen

I could go on. But here:

In the beginning, few people imagined that anyone would compose at the machine. The user of the typewriter would be an amanuensis—in other words, a secretary—taking dictation from another person. Accordingly, in the early days the word “typewriter” was used to mean not just the machine but the person plying it. That person, the Remington folks assumed, would be a woman. (The flowers printed on the casing of the early models were to make the mechanism seem friendly to the weaker sex.) Remington’s prediction was correct. It was often as typists that women poured into the professional workforce at the turn of the century.

in which
theredshoes
made this 10000000 times better (I inherited & used the same Smith-Corona model as Plath did, which always pleases me inordinately)

Heh, I’m just always such the Angry Feminist Bitch Demanding Representation, always. WHERE ARE THE WOMEN AT? WE’RE MORE THAN HALF, DAMMIT, THERE SHOULD BE SOME OF US IN THERE. When I was a teenager I read that bit — is it Samuel R. Delany’s? — about how when you think there’s an equal number of men and women somewhere, if you count, it’s almost always 1/3 women or less, and ever sine then it’s been automatic.

Cite Arrow reblogged from aerialiste

My Least Favorite Trope (and this post will include spoilers for The Lego Movie, Guardians of the Galaxy, The Matrix, Western Civilization, and—cod help me—Bulletproof Monk*.) is the thing where there’s an awesome, smart, wonderful, powerful female character who by all rights ought to be the Chosen One and the hero of the movie, who is tasked with taking care of some generally ineffectual male character who is, for reasons of wish fulfillment, actually the person the film focuses on. She mentors him, she teaches him, and she inevitably becomes his girlfriend… and he gets the job she wanted: he gets to be the Chosen One even though she’s obviously far more qualified. And all he has to do to get it and deserve it is Man Up and Take Responsibility.

And that’s it. Every god-damned time. The mere fact of naming the films above and naming the trope gives away the entire plot and character arc of every single movie.

Elizabeth Bear - My Least Favorite Trope (via feministquotes)
Cite Arrow reblogged from mswyrr
Lindsey Danilack, captain of the Army women’s track and field team, at a meet.

….Col. Andrew Efaw and Amy Efaw pinned the bars on Alexandra Efaw during her commissioning ceremony….“My parents both graduated” from the academy, Anastasia Efaw says. “My dad’s brother went to West Point. My mom’s sister. My mom’s sister’s husband. . . . We all thought that when you went to college, you just go to West Point.”

- "The Women of West Point"

Lindsey Danilack, captain of the Army women’s track and field team, at a meet.

….Col. Andrew Efaw and Amy Efaw pinned the bars on Alexandra Efaw during her commissioning ceremony….“My parents both graduated” from the academy, Anastasia Efaw says. “My dad’s brother went to West Point. My mom’s sister. My mom’s sister’s husband. . . . We all thought that when you went to college, you just go to West Point.”

- "The Women of West Point"

George R.R. Martin is not your bitch.

Neil Gaiman’s Journal: Entitlement issues*…

— yeah and while we’re at it —

I DIDN’T LIKE THAT EITHER. (DON’T TELL ME. YOU GUESSED.) ARE YOU SURE YOU WANT ME TO SPEND TIME POINTING OUT ALL THE MISOGYNIST SHIT I DON’T LIKE IN INTERNET CULTURE? WE COULD BE HERE A WHILE. DECADES AND CENTURIES. LIKE THAT GUY GUARDING THE HOLY GRAIL IN THE INDIANA JONES MOVIE. LET’S TALK ABOUT PANCAKE-STEALING KITTENS INSTEAD.

(Neil Gaiman saying that was like John Lennon singing “Woman is the N——- of the World”** which was also A WORLD OF NO. IT IS TWENTY-FUCKING FOURTEEN. MUST WE DO THIS? MUST WE REALLY HAVE THIS GODDANM DANCE?)

(…..NEVER MIND.)

//goes and looks at mswyrr’s seascape tag for a while //as followers drift away like cherry petals


*that title he chose just fucking kills me. AND NOT IN THE GOOD WAY.

**yes, I do know Yoko Ono supposedly came up with it, THANKS

There’s an enormous difference between taking a private picture for somebody and having it hacked and exposed to the public. Just because a person isn’t vigilantly guarding whatever pictures they’ve taken DOES NOT MEAN THEY ARE THE PROPERTY OF THE PUBLIC. I know we as society have developed what my dear late mother would call “a nose problem” and feel the need to take pictures of total strangers in public so they can entertain their Twitter/Facebook/Kik/Vine/Tumblr/what have you followers with their non-stop flood of opinions, but it’s a simple fact of life: you don’t own the world. You don’t own people’s bodies just because you think they’re attractive (or unattractive) and want to be snide about them, get revenge upon them, or jerk off to them. It’s not my job to be constantly vigilant about my appearance in public so I won’t be photographed and mocked, and it’s not the average person’s job to be constantly paranoid that every single picture they take for their personal enjoyment might be exposed at any second. Life is not a totalitarian gulag where I have to constantly live looking over my shoulder for fear that I’m fucking some criminal. There’s a huge difference between being responsible and being failed by the moral deficits of others and technological imperfections.

….King Solomon supposedly once said that justice will only be achieved when those who are not injured by the crime feel as indignant as those who are. Some people just don’t have that kind of empathy and compassion.

magpie’s nest

quoted for
MOTHER
FUCKING
TRUTH

(Source: radiantasthesun89)

Cite Arrow reblogged from mswyrr
the-uncensored-she:

Tell me again why a women’s liberation movement is no longer needed.

the-uncensored-she:

Tell me again why a women’s liberation movement is no longer needed.

(Source: yoursocialconstructsareshowing)

Cite Arrow reblogged from ironedorchid