All my life I have been happiest when the folks watching me said to each other, “Look at the poor dope, will ya?”  — Buster Keaton

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The problem with cultural appropriation is that it replaces the original with a copy created by the dominant culture. It dilutes the original, removes all symbolic value from it and replaces it with a ready to consume product devoid of context and meaning.

Cultural appropriation, at its most extreme, is a violent form of colonization because it removes the original group behind the culture and reinforces stereotypes about that group (i.e. ALL First Nation folks are reduced to “war bonnets”, whether their culture uses them or not; all Latin@s are reduced to a stylized version of Catholicism regardless of their spirituality; etc.). The mechanism of commodifying a culture ends up being a tool to re-inforce [sic] racism as it reduces the people behind those cultures to a mere cartoon like representation of their realities. It’s a great way to ultimately Other and objectify entire groups of people by taking something that is dynamic and ever evolving and freezing it for a marketing photo opportunity.

Flavia Dzodan (via vintagevision)

(Source: seppin)

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Life is a gamble, at terrible odds — if it was a bet you wouldn’t take it. Tom Stoppard, Rosencrantz & Guildenstern Are Dead (via liquidnight)
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And with my cheek leant upon the window pane I like to fancy that I am pressing as closely as can be upon the massy wall of time, which is forever lifting and pulling and letting fresh spaces of life in upon us. May it be mine to taste the moment before it has spread itself over the rest of the world! Let me taste the newest and the freshest. Virginia Woolf, “The Journal of Mistress Joan Martyn” (via liquidnight)
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We still, alas, cannot forestall it—

This dreadful ailment’s heavy toll;

The spleen is what the English call it,

We call it simply Russian soul.

Eugene Onegin, Alexander Pushkin (via i-starchild)
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What I want is to possess my readers while they are reading my book— if I can, to possess them in ways that other writers don’t. Then let them return, just as they were, to a world where everybody else is working to change, persuade, tempt, and control them. The best readers come to fiction to be free of all that noise, to have set loose in them the consciousness that’s otherwise conditioned and hemmed in by all that isn’t fiction. This is something that every child, smitten by books, understands immediately, though it’s not at all a childish idea about the importance of reading. Philip Roth (via libraryland)
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SIR – I must object in the strongest terms to the use of the oxymoronic neologism, “bottomless shallows”, in a Banyan column. Please inform your Mr Banyan that oxymorons must be stamped out wherever found, and are particularly galling in a newspaper of your standing and heritage. I am certain that Messrs Samuel Johnson, Walter Bagehot and Henry Watson Fowler are all spinning in their respective graves at this slight, albeit at different speeds. You know well how lapses like this affect school truancy, foment social disorder and encourage a preference for margarine on one’s scones. Sin not again.

An Economist reader reminds us of our responsibilities. And rightly so. (via theeconomist)

I think I’m in love.

(via perstephsanscouronne)
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Mediocrities everywhere, I absolve you. I absolve you all.

Amadeus (via fuckyeahgreatplays)

thanks, Salieri, I appreciate it.

(via shredsandpatches)
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The first time I read an excellent work, it is to me just as if I gained a new friend; and when I read over a book I have perused before, it resembles the meeting of an old one. George Gissing (via libraryland)
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dvskitten:

“Poetry is the journal of the sea animal living on land, wanting to fly in the air.  Poetry is a search for syllables to shoot at the barriers of the unknown and the unknowable.  Poetry is a phantom script telling how rainbows are made and why they go away.”  
~Carl Sandburg, Poetry Considered

dvskitten:

“Poetry is the journal of the sea animal living on land, wanting to fly in the air.  Poetry is a search for syllables to shoot at the barriers of the unknown and the unknowable.  Poetry is a phantom script telling how rainbows are made and why they go away.”  

~Carl SandburgPoetry Considered

(Source: milkshakesandheartaches)

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