todaysdocument:

September 9 - Chrysanthemum Day
Chrysanthemum Day is celebrated on September 9th in Japan.  This image is dated November 25, 1942 and is part of the Records of the War Relocation Activity.  The original caption:

Gila River Relocation Center, Rivers, Arizona. Watering chrysanthemum plants in “Nakata and Son” hot house. Many rare and patented flowers have been developed by this firm. Some of the blooms shown in this picture have never been shown before.

todaysdocument:

September 9 - Chrysanthemum Day

Chrysanthemum Day is celebrated on September 9th in Japan.  This image is dated November 25, 1942 and is part of the Records of the War Relocation Activity.  The original caption:

Gila River Relocation Center, Rivers, Arizona. Watering chrysanthemum plants in “Nakata and Son” hot house. Many rare and patented flowers have been developed by this firm. Some of the blooms shown in this picture have never been shown before.

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todaysdocument:

Introducing the latest Tumblr Blog from the National Archives - Congress in the Archives:
CongressArchives:

Welcome to Congress in the Archives! This blog has been designed to give you an inside look at the Center for Legislative Archives and the historical records of Congress that we hold. We will feature documents on significant events in history as well as some of the unexpected treasures in our holdings, suggest lesson ideas for teachers, share our researchers’ experiences, and introduce our staff. We hope that you let us know what you like, and what else you would enjoy seeing featured here. We look forward to hearing from you!
“Congress Comes to Order,” by Clifford Berryman, Washington Evening Star, December 2, 1912, U.S. Senate Collection (ARC 306178)

todaysdocument:

Introducing the latest Tumblr Blog from the National Archives - Congress in the Archives:

CongressArchives:

Welcome to Congress in the Archives! This blog has been designed to give you an inside look at the Center for Legislative Archives and the historical records of Congress that we hold. We will feature documents on significant events in history as well as some of the unexpected treasures in our holdings, suggest lesson ideas for teachers, share our researchers’ experiences, and introduce our staff. We hope that you let us know what you like, and what else you would enjoy seeing featured here. We look forward to hearing from you!

Congress Comes to Order,” by Clifford Berryman, Washington Evening Star, December 2, 1912, U.S. Senate Collection (ARC 306178)

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todaysdocument:

Dated September 5, 1933, this photograph shows progress of the exterior framing of the National Archives Building in Washington, DC. Construction on the building was first started in September, 1931.

todaysdocument:

Dated September 5, 1933, this photograph shows progress of the exterior framing of the National Archives Building in Washington, DC. Construction on the building was first started in September, 1931.

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todaysdocument:

August 31, 2005 - A statue is partially submerged in flood waters as a result of Hurricane Katrina. 
New Orleans, Louisiana.  Photo by Jocelyn Augustino of FEMA.  

todaysdocument:

August 31, 2005 - A statue is partially submerged in flood waters as a result of Hurricane Katrina.

New Orleans, Louisiana.  Photo by Jocelyn Augustino of FEMA.  

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todaysdocument:

Meter reading was very stylish in 1918.  
“Minneapolis General Electric Co. Meter Readers” is dated August 31, 1918 and comes from the Records of the Women’s Bureau, Department of Labor.  

todaysdocument:

Meter reading was very stylish in 1918.  

“Minneapolis General Electric Co. Meter Readers” is dated August 31, 1918 and comes from the Records of the Women’s Bureau, Department of Labor.  

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todaysdocument:

Because you probably don’t know what a “teletype” machine looks like…     
ourpresidents:

The White House to Kremlin “Hotline” 
On August 30, 1963, The Kennedy White House announced the creation of a teletype “Hotline” between the Kremlin and the White House.  The Hotline was established in the aftermath to the Cuban Missile Crisis -  to be used only in an emergency to ensure clear communication between the President and the Soviet Premier.
The White House Hotline teletype machine was used for the first time for communication between President Lyndon Johnson and Soviet Premier Alexsei Kosygin during the Six Day War in the Middle East. 
These days, the Hotline machine is on exhibit at the LBJ Library & Museum. 

todaysdocument:

Because you probably don’t know what a “teletype” machine looks like…     

ourpresidents:

The White House to Kremlin “Hotline”

On August 30, 1963, The Kennedy White House announced the creation of a teletype “Hotline” between the Kremlin and the White House.  The Hotline was established in the aftermath to the Cuban Missile Crisis -  to be used only in an emergency to ensure clear communication between the President and the Soviet Premier.

The White House Hotline teletype machine was used for the first time for communication between President Lyndon Johnson and Soviet Premier Alexsei Kosygin during the Six Day War in the Middle East.

These days, the Hotline machine is on exhibit at the LBJ Library & Museum

Cite Arrow reblogged from todaysdocument

todaysdocument:

“I Have a Dream” today…

In part 3 of “The March,” we hear Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech. This film was produced by the United States Information Agency (USIA) about the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.

Read the transcript for this segment and watch Part 1 and Part 2 of “The March.”

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todaysdocument:

August 28, 1963 - The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

These are images of the march from the Washington Monument to the Lincoln Memorial.  

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