theossuary:

This is probably my favorite all-time picture of James Dean, for obvious reasons. I also found this on Wikipedia:

While completing Giant, and to promote Rebel Without a Cause, Dean filmed a short interview with actor Gig Young for an episode of Warner Bros. Presents in which Dean, instead of saying the popular phrase “The life you save may be your own” instead ad-libbed ”The life you might save might be mine.” [sic] Dean’s sudden death prompted the studio to re-film the section, and the piece was never aired—though in the past several sources have referred to the footage, mistakenly identifying it as a public service announcement. (The segment can, however, be viewed on both the 2001 VHS and 2005 DVD editions of Rebel Without a Cause.)

Seriously, people? Be careful out there on the roads, because that is some dangerous and serious shit. People are getting more device-distracted by the hour out there, and I’ve had many close calls just in the last few months. I don’t care how comfortable the interior of your SUV is and how much cool shit you can go beep-boop-boop on while you drive; just please fucking pay attention.

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day (Historical): James Dean (1955)
On this date fifty-six years ago, James Dean died from injuries received in a car accident in his Porsche 550 Spyder. He was only 24 years old. Dean, who spent most of his childhood on his aunt and uncle’s farm in Fair Mount, Indiana, moved to California after high school and attended UCLA. He dropped out in 1951 to pursue an acting career. Good move.
Dean landed three starring roles in three films: East of Eden (1955), Rebel Without a Cause (1955), and Giant (1956). Besides a few uncredited roles, that’s Dean’s entire filmography. However, he shone is all three roles and was the first actor to receive a posthumous Academy Award nomination, Best Actor for East of Eden. He received another Best Actor nod for Giant.
(Image copyright Dennis Stock from his collection, James Dean: A Memorial Portfolio, 1955/1979. A majority of the photos, including this macabre image, were taken in Fairmount, Indiana shortly before his death. The image is courtesy of The Museum of Contemporary Photography, which is located in Chicago.)

theossuary:

This is probably my favorite all-time picture of James Dean, for obvious reasons. I also found this on Wikipedia:

While completing Giant, and to promote Rebel Without a Cause, Dean filmed a short interview with actor Gig Young for an episode of Warner Bros. Presents in which Dean, instead of saying the popular phrase “The life you save may be your own” instead ad-libbed ”The life you might save might be mine.” [sic] Dean’s sudden death prompted the studio to re-film the section, and the piece was never aired—though in the past several sources have referred to the footage, mistakenly identifying it as a public service announcement. (The segment can, however, be viewed on both the 2001 VHS and 2005 DVD editions of Rebel Without a Cause.)

Seriously, people? Be careful out there on the roads, because that is some dangerous and serious shit. People are getting more device-distracted by the hour out there, and I’ve had many close calls just in the last few months. I don’t care how comfortable the interior of your SUV is and how much cool shit you can go beep-boop-boop on while you drive; just please fucking pay attention.

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day (Historical): James Dean (1955)

On this date fifty-six years ago, James Dean died from injuries received in a car accident in his Porsche 550 Spyder. He was only 24 years old. Dean, who spent most of his childhood on his aunt and uncle’s farm in Fair Mount, Indiana, moved to California after high school and attended UCLA. He dropped out in 1951 to pursue an acting career. Good move.

Dean landed three starring roles in three films: East of Eden (1955), Rebel Without a Cause (1955), and Giant (1956). Besides a few uncredited roles, that’s Dean’s entire filmography. However, he shone is all three roles and was the first actor to receive a posthumous Academy Award nomination, Best Actor for East of Eden. He received another Best Actor nod for Giant.

(Image copyright Dennis Stock from his collection, James Dean: A Memorial Portfolio, 1955/1979. A majority of the photos, including this macabre image, were taken in Fairmount, Indiana shortly before his death. The image is courtesy of The Museum of Contemporary Photography, which is located in Chicago.)

Cite Arrow reblogged from theossuary
theatlantic:

A Jobs Plan for the Post-Cubicle Economy
 

About 150 years ago, American workers began a profound shift from farms to factories. After suffering through poor work conditions, low pay, and no workplace protections, the workers organized and successfully helped build the framework of laws that became known as FDR’s New Deal. This landmark legislation from the 1930s protected workers and supported labor unions by limiting the number of hours that could be worked and setting a baseline minimum pay. But from a larger perspective, the New Deal demonstrated that government had acknowledged the shift in the U.S. workforce, heard their voice, and created a new system in which they could thrive.
Now we find ourselves in the middle of an equally large transition: just as workers left the plow for the assembly line, they are now leaving the cubicle for the coffee shop. Welcome to the Gig Economy, where over 42 million Americans are working independently - as freelancers, part-timers, consultants, contractors, and the self-employed. They are simultaneously holding multiple jobs, working for different employers, and mastering diverse skills. They are accountants and fashion designers and website architects. And, they are completely left out of the New Deal, which protects the rest of the workforce.

Read more at The Atlantic

theatlantic:

A Jobs Plan for the Post-Cubicle Economy

About 150 years ago, American workers began a profound shift from farms to factories. After suffering through poor work conditions, low pay, and no workplace protections, the workers organized and successfully helped build the framework of laws that became known as FDR’s New Deal. This landmark legislation from the 1930s protected workers and supported labor unions by limiting the number of hours that could be worked and setting a baseline minimum pay. But from a larger perspective, the New Deal demonstrated that government had acknowledged the shift in the U.S. workforce, heard their voice, and created a new system in which they could thrive.

Now we find ourselves in the middle of an equally large transition: just as workers left the plow for the assembly line, they are now leaving the cubicle for the coffee shop. Welcome to the Gig Economy, where over 42 million Americans are working independently - as freelancers, part-timers, consultants, contractors, and the self-employed. They are simultaneously holding multiple jobs, working for different employers, and mastering diverse skills. They are accountants and fashion designers and website architects. And, they are completely left out of the New Deal, which protects the rest of the workforce.

Read more at The Atlantic

Cite Arrow reblogged from theatlantic

funeralsauce:

MORGUE MAESTROS

Photography by Max Merz

Published July, 2011 

Remigijus and Nerijus Diechkus are brothers whose day jobs consist of cutting apart and embalming human flesh at a morgue in Vilnius, Lithuania. They are also musicians—Remigijus is the vocalist for the black-metal band Dissimulation, while Nerijus drums in a pop band called the Fly. German photographer Max Merz documented their gruesome livelihood, noting that they were extremely cordial family men who very much enjoy their alcohol. We don’t think there’s anything wrong with that, especially considering their line of work.


Read the rest at Vice Magazine: MORGUE MAESTROS - Photography by Max Merz - Vice Magazine

Cite Arrow reblogged from theossuary