skibinskipedia:

chagalov:

Vladimir Nabokov inspecting a butterfly,  Harvard (Museum of Comparative Zoology), Nov. 1946 -by Constantin Joffe
[Great to read: The Atlantic Online, April 2000 and some update: The New York Times, Jan. 25, 2011]
entregulistanybostan:

Vladimir Nabokov inspects a tiny ButterlyVia Tom Sutpen  [Corbis]

skibinskipedia:

chagalov:

Vladimir Nabokov inspecting a butterfly, Harvard (Museum of Comparative Zoology), Nov. 1946 -by Constantin Joffe

[Great to read: The Atlantic Online, April 2000 and some update: The New York Times, Jan. 25, 2011]

entregulistanybostan:

Vladimir Nabokov inspects a tiny Butterly
Via Tom Sutpen  [Corbis]

Cite Arrow reblogged from skibinskipedia
stilllifequickheart:

Maxwell Armfield
Three Feathers
1948

stilllifequickheart:

Maxwell Armfield

Three Feathers

1948

Cite Arrow reblogged from stilllifequickheart
liquidnight:

Wayne F. Miller
“Simple” was a character the poet Langston Hughes used in his syndicated newspaper column. Upon seeing the man in this photograph, Hughes said, “That’s him.”
Midwest United States, 1946-49
Published in Ebony, December 1951
From Wayne F. Miller: Photographs 1942-1958

liquidnight:

Wayne F. Miller

“Simple” was a character the poet Langston Hughes used in his syndicated newspaper column. Upon seeing the man in this photograph, Hughes said, “That’s him.”

Midwest United States, 1946-49

Published in Ebony, December 1951

From Wayne F. Miller: Photographs 1942-1958

Cite Arrow reblogged from liquidnight
This movie is still scary hot. I don’t think I ever recovered from the jolt of seeing it in my teens. Years later people raved about Body Heat, which I like too, but just seems like a pale imitation.


oldhollywood:

Barbara Stanwyck & Fred MacMurray in Double Indemnity (1946, dir. Billy Wilder, based on the novel by James M. Cain)
I knew then what I had done. I had killed a man. I had killed a man to get a woman. I had put myself in her power, so there was one person in the world that could point a finger at me, and I would have to die. I had done all that for her, and I never wanted to see her again as long as I lived.
That’s all it takes, one drop of fear, to curdle love into hate.
- James M. Cain, Double Indemnity
This movie is still scary hot. I don’t think I ever recovered from the jolt of seeing it in my teens. Years later people raved about Body Heat, which I like too, but just seems like a pale imitation.

oldhollywood:

Barbara Stanwyck & Fred MacMurray in Double Indemnity (1946, dir. Billy Wilder, based on the novel by James M. Cain)

I knew then what I had done. I had killed a man. I had killed a man to get a woman. I had put myself in her power, so there was one person in the world that could point a finger at me, and I would have to die. I had done all that for her, and I never wanted to see her again as long as I lived.

That’s all it takes, one drop of fear, to curdle love into hate.

- James M. Cain, Double Indemnity

Cite Arrow reblogged from oldhollywood
liquidnight:

Wayne F. Miller
Hiroshima, Japan, August 1945
Japanese soldiers and civilians crowd trains to Tokyo at a Hiroshima station after the demobilization of the Japanese army.
From Wayne F. Miller: Photographs 1942-1958

liquidnight:

Wayne F. Miller

Hiroshima, Japan, August 1945

Japanese soldiers and civilians crowd trains to Tokyo at a Hiroshima station after the demobilization of the Japanese army.

From Wayne F. Miller: Photographs 1942-1958

Cite Arrow reblogged from liquidnight
skibinskipedia:

dirtyteeth: Tsuguhara Foujita, At The Cafe, 1949. Cite Arrow reblogged from skibinskipedia