centuriespast:

TURA, CosmèEleonora of Aragon1478-79Tempera and gold on vellum, 240 x 160 mmThe Morgan Library and Museum, New York

THAT BLUE, THAT BLUE RIGHT BEHIND HER, THERE, THAT’S TOTALLY IT

(…..everyone following my blog for some reason: “omg wtf shut up about this damn colour”)

centuriespast:

TURA, Cosmè
Eleonora of Aragon
1478-79
Tempera and gold on vellum, 240 x 160 mm
The Morgan Library and Museum, New York

THAT BLUE, THAT BLUE RIGHT BEHIND HER, THERE, THAT’S TOTALLY IT

(…..everyone following my blog for some reason: “omg wtf shut up about this damn colour”)
Cite Arrow reblogged from centuriespast
nyrbclassics:

A preview of the table of contents from our forthcoming collection of poems (translated by Jason Weiss) by the Argentinian fabulist Silvina Ocampo, coming this January.

nyrbclassics:

A preview of the table of contents from our forthcoming collection of poems (translated by Jason Weiss) by the Argentinian fabulist Silvina Ocampo, coming this January.

Cite Arrow reblogged from nyrbclassics
Word of the day: 浮泛 (Chinese)

oupacademic:

Float in water.

image

Image: Vitória Régia Water Lily at Pantanal Matogrossense, Brazil by miquitos. CC BY-SA 2.0 via Flickr.

Cite Arrow reblogged from oupacademic
lionofchaeronea:

A monk-cellarer, while filling a jug with wine from a barrel, sneaks a drink for himself.  Illumination from Li Livres dou Santé by Aldobrandino of Siena, France, late 13th century; now in the British Library.

lionofchaeronea:

A monk-cellarer, while filling a jug with wine from a barrel, sneaks a drink for himself.  Illumination from Li Livres dou Santé by Aldobrandino of Siena, France, late 13th century; now in the British Library.

Cite Arrow reblogged from sexycodicology

briefexperience said: What do you think of works of Caravaggio? Did he invent something new? If yes, what is it?

centuriespast:

Yes, I dig him. There is nothing new under the sun but I’d say he really brought an expressionist twist to the painterly proceedings.

'expressionist twist to the painterly proceedings'

see that’s why y’all need to be following this blog
right fucking there

Cite Arrow reblogged from centuriespast
classicpenguin:


oddismycopilot:
I love my books: Elizabeth Gaskell. If you like George Eliot, you should definitely check out Elizabeth Gaskell. A contemporary of both Eliot and Dickens, Gaskell likewise wrote about a broad swath of English society, including the working class, the plight of the poor, and labor unrest; her concern about social issues is best demonstrated in Mary Barton and North and South. I consider Wives and Daughters to be quite similar in tone and feel to Middlemarch and very nearly its equal. Cranford, although virtually plotless, is such a charming and gently humorous look at small-town life in mid-19th-century England that it ranks among my all-time fiction favorites.

Happy weekend reading, everyone!


Reblogging my girl Charlotte’s would-be bestie Lily.

classicpenguin:

oddismycopilot:

I love my books: Elizabeth Gaskell. If you like George Eliot, you should definitely check out Elizabeth Gaskell. A contemporary of both Eliot and Dickens, Gaskell likewise wrote about a broad swath of English society, including the working class, the plight of the poor, and labor unrest; her concern about social issues is best demonstrated in Mary Barton and North and South. I consider Wives and Daughters to be quite similar in tone and feel to Middlemarch and very nearly its equal. Cranford, although virtually plotless, is such a charming and gently humorous look at small-town life in mid-19th-century England that it ranks among my all-time fiction favorites.

Happy weekend reading, everyone!

Reblogging my girl Charlotte’s would-be bestie Lily.

Cite Arrow reblogged from powells

unabridgedchick:

This past weekend, our dear friends threw us a wonderful baby shower — unsurprisingly, bookish themed! 

My girlfriends used my wife’s favorite baby book, All the World, as a guestbook — and everyone left a note to us and our Little Reader.  It was wonderfully touching.

There weren’t many baby games as there was mostly eating, gabbing, eating, and present-opening.

Among the many delicious things were:

  •     One fish, two fish, red fish, (goldfish crackers)
  •     Green eggs and (deviled) ham
  •     Bread and jam (and brie) for Frances
  •     Cloudy with a chance of (cocktail) meatballs
  •     Frecklejuice (punch made w white grape juice, pomegranate juice, and ginger ale)
  •     The hungry hungry caterpillar (apples with spiced caramel cream cheese dip)
  •     Madeleine’s French onion dip

and of course, a wonderful book-shaped cake!  It was a wonderful afternoon, full of love and great reads (we were gifted so many fabulous books — photo post on that later!).  I’m so pleased our Little Reader is coming into the world surrounded by so much love.

How cool are the Boston ladies? only so cool, they throw THE BEST BABY SHOWER EVER.

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fuckyeahvintageillustration:

'Peer Gynt - a dramatic poem' by Henrik Ibsen; illustrated by Arthur Rackham. Published 1936 by J. B. Lippincott, Philadelphia.

See the complete book here.

Always reblog Rackham!

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strandbooks:

Okay, you guys. Confession. This one is from me.


Underlined passage, Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy, page 256.

I hate Cormac McCarthy but that’s pretty neat.

Cite Arrow reblogged from strandbooks