ADVENTURE most unto itself
The Soul condemned to be;
Attended by a Single Hound—
Its own Identity.
1. “Adventure most unto itself.” Part Five: The Single Hound. Dickinson, Emily. 1924. Complete Poems
oupacademic:

What is it like living with schizophrenia? In this podcast, Oral History Review (OHR) contributors Drs. Linda Crane and Tracy McDonough answer OHR Managing Editor Troy Reeves’s questions about the Schizophrenia Oral History Project and why the stigma around schizophrenia has to change.
Image: Painting by Alice Fisher, SOHP narrator, do not re-use without permission.

oupacademic:

What is it like living with schizophrenia? In this podcastOral History Review (OHR) contributors Drs. Linda Crane and Tracy McDonough answer OHR Managing Editor Troy Reeves’s questions about the Schizophrenia Oral History Project and why the stigma around schizophrenia has to change.

Image: Painting by Alice Fisher, SOHP narrator, do not re-use without permission.

Cite Arrow reblogged from oupacademic
It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it.

Aristotle (384-322 BCE)

What did Aristotle really mean when he referred to “phronesis”? Is knowledge eternal? How many ways are there for us to arrive at “truth”? David Blockley explores the concept of practical wisdom and explains why we need to value it.

(via oupacademic)
Cite Arrow reblogged from oupacademic

eadfrith:

Sir Thomas Holme’s Book of Arms - folio 14r

Two Knights in armour and colourful Tabards, these are from Suffolk.  Pike cover the tabard of one of the Knights.

Harley MS 4205, Manuscript made in England, probably London between 1445-1524.

Images from The British Library Manuscript website.

http://www.bl.uk/manuscripts/FullDisplay.aspx?ref=Harley_MS_4205

Cite Arrow reblogged from sexycodicology
oupacademic:


On the corner of Congress street and Broadway near the tavern, then, and for aught I know to the contrary, still kept by Mr. Moon, I was met by two gentlemen of respectable appearance, both of whom were entirely unknown to me. I have the impression that they were introduced to me by some one of my acquaintances, but who, I have in vain endeavored to recall, with the remark that I was an expert player on the violin.

Read the full chapter from Twelve Years a Slave: Narrative of Solomon Northup, a Citizen of New-York, Kidnapped in Washington City in 1841, and Rescued in 1853, in which Solomon Northup meets the two men who eventually trick him into slavery, available via North Carolina Scholarship Online.
Image: Sketch of Solomon Northup by Nebro, 1855. Public domain via Wikimedia Commons.

oupacademic:

On the corner of Congress street and Broadway near the tavern, then, and for aught I know to the contrary, still kept by Mr. Moon, I was met by two gentlemen of respectable appearance, both of whom were entirely unknown to me. I have the impression that they were introduced to me by some one of my acquaintances, but who, I have in vain endeavored to recall, with the remark that I was an expert player on the violin.

Read the full chapter from Twelve Years a Slave: Narrative of Solomon Northup, a Citizen of New-York, Kidnapped in Washington City in 1841, and Rescued in 1853, in which Solomon Northup meets the two men who eventually trick him into slavery, available via North Carolina Scholarship Online.

Image: Sketch of Solomon Northup by Nebro, 1855. Public domain via Wikimedia Commons.

Cite Arrow reblogged from oupacademic
oupacademic:

After welcoming North Carolina Scholarship Online to University Press Scholarship Online on Friday, free chapters from Twelve Years a Slave have been made free on UPSO for a month starting today.
Image: Steve McQueen holding Best Picture Oscar, March 2014, by Aprillamb. CC-BY-SA-3.0 via Wikimedia Commons.

oupacademic:

After welcoming North Carolina Scholarship Online to University Press Scholarship Online on Friday, free chapters from Twelve Years a Slave have been made free on UPSO for a month starting today.

Image: Steve McQueen holding Best Picture Oscar, March 2014, by Aprillamb. CC-BY-SA-3.0 via Wikimedia Commons.

Cite Arrow reblogged from oupacademic
houghtonlib:

Byron, George Gordon Byron, Baron, 1788-1824. Don Juan : canto I to V, 1824.
*76-1010
Houghton Library, Harvard University

houghtonlib:

Byron, George Gordon Byron, Baron, 1788-1824. Don Juan : canto I to V, 1824.

*76-1010

Houghton Library, Harvard University

Cite Arrow reblogged from houghtonlib
archaicwonder:

Charon’s Obol: How ancients paid the ferryman
Charon’s obol (aka danake) is the coin placed in or on the mouth of a dead person before burial. Greek and Latin literary sources explain it as a payment or a bribe for Charon, the ferryman who conveyed souls across the River Styx, which divided the world of the living from the world of the dead.
More precious gold or silver coins were seldom buried with the deceased so a type of “ghost money” was made instead by making an impression of a real coin into thin gold foil. These types of pseudo-coins were too flimsy to use as currency. This particular gold piece (c. 5th-1st century BC) was obviously modeled from the bee drachms from Ephesos (or Arados). Actual coins were also buried with the dead as well, though they were generally small denominations.
Two more examples of Charon’s Obols can be seen here and here.

archaicwonder:

Charon’s Obol: How ancients paid the ferryman

Charon’s obol (aka danake) is the coin placed in or on the mouth of a dead person before burial. Greek and Latin literary sources explain it as a payment or a bribe for Charon, the ferryman who conveyed souls across the River Styx, which divided the world of the living from the world of the dead.

More precious gold or silver coins were seldom buried with the deceased so a type of “ghost money” was made instead by making an impression of a real coin into thin gold foil. These types of pseudo-coins were too flimsy to use as currency. This particular gold piece (c. 5th-1st century BC) was obviously modeled from the bee drachms from Ephesos (or Arados). Actual coins were also buried with the dead as well, though they were generally small denominations.

Two more examples of Charon’s Obols can be seen here and here.

Cite Arrow reblogged from archaicwonder

ancientart:

Her gods and men call Aphrodite, and Aphrogeneia (the foam-born) because she grew amid the foam.” -Hesiod, Theogony 176.

A few depictions of Aphrodite, the Greek goddess of love and beauty, in ancient Greek pottery.

Aphrodite and Adonis (detail). Attic red-figure squat lekythos, Aison, ca. 410 BC. Courtesy of the Louvre, MNB 2109. Photo by Marie-Lan Nguyen.

Aphrodite on a swan (detail). Tondo from an Attic white-ground red-figured kylix. From tomb F43 in Kameiros (Rhodes). Pistoxenos Painter, circa 460 BC. Courtesy of the British MuseumGR 1869.10-7.77. Photo by Marie-Lan Nguyen.

Vessel with Leda and the Swan (detail). Attributed to the Painter of Louvre MNB 1148, Greek, Apulia, South Italy, about 330 B.C. Courtesy of the Getty Villa, 86.AE.680. Photo by Dave & Margie Hill.

Cite Arrow reblogged from ancientart